The Consecrated Holy Hands of Catholic Priests

O wonderful dignity of the priests,” cries out St. Augustine; “in their hands, as in the womb of the Blessed Virgin, the Son of God becomes incarnate.”

The Last Fatima Prayer, received in 1929:

O most holy Trinity, Father , son, and Holy Ghost, I adore Thee profoundly. I offer Thee the most precious Blood, Body, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the TABERNACLES of the World, in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges,, and indifference by which He is offended. ‘By the infinite merits of the SACRED HEART of Jesus, and the immaculate Heart of Mary, I beg the conversion of poor sinners.’

How prophetic is this 1929 Fatima REPARATION Prayer-and-worship?

Who in 1929, would have believed that our Church in “the breath of fresh air”, described in 1964 for protestation in the name of Ecumenism, could have fallen so far? That these outrages would become the norm with the Vatican II, protestation in our Church’s and near our altars? Not only allowing such outrages, sacrileges and sacrileges to take place, but they continue even years of Vatican instructions (2000) and the USAB instructions to correct (2002)?

City asks what is your Church doing? Following the guidelines or something different?

Tonite for First Friday June, Sacred Heart novena, I watched 4 LEMS walk to the top altar level, then proceed to spill the “Blood of Christ”, dumbfounded each stood doing nothing, as our Holy Priest, (Jesus in persona) stooped to clean up their mess. Moments later (without proper washing, with water on the floor), the LEM steps on the spot the Blood of Christ had fallen! What pain, what agony, my Eucharistic Joy fumbled to dismay! Then on Pentecost Sunday, I watch LEM’s present the “Blood of Christ to each other, not from a Deacon of Priest ( as required see below)…. What other abuses are happening?

[Using these 2 examples: if your hands are Not “consecrated, ordained holy hands” to hold the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity” of Jesus Christ, then WHY DO YOU DO IT?! Is this ministry worth it, for your soul? Instead, pray this last Fatima prayer, that others stop also.]

Someone or many have turned “only when necessary into everyday Praxis, where LEM’s (Lay Extra-Ordinary Ministers), administer Eucharist to fewer than 10 people each???? This is a necessity? Or a new Norm?

LEM’s are used even in daily mass with less than 50 people attending? Bare shouldered woman reach their unholy hands in the tabernacle, to retrieve the Angelic Host (Our Lord), just moments after downing her daily contraceptive pills, before mass?, she is our volunteer ( LEM) for the sick. When she performs her duty, while the priest meets & greets at the back of the church as the faithful proceed out?

So is City being Picayune? Or is this flagrantly normal PRAXIS? at your church too?

St Peter’s Holy hands available

Holy Hands – What did “Thomas say?”

SUMMA: Question 82. The minister of this sacrament

Article 3. Whether dispensing of this sacrament belongs to a priest alone?

Objection 1. It seems that the dispensing of this sacrament does not belong to a priest alone. ?{Vatican II & USACB}

For Christ’s blood belongs to this sacrament no less than His body. But Christ’s blood is dispensed by deacons: hence the blessed Lawrence said to the blessed Sixtus (Office of St. Lawrence, Resp. at Matins): “Try whether you have chosen a fit minister, to whom you have entrusted the dispensing of the Lord’s blood.” Therefore, with equal reason the dispensing of Christ’s body does not belong to priests only.

Objection 2. Further, priests are the appointed ministers of the sacraments.

But this sacrament is completed in the consecration of the matter, and not in the use, to which the dispensing belongs. Therefore it seems that it does not belong to a priest to dispense the Lord’s body.

Objection 3. Further, Dionysius says (Eccl. Hier. iii, iv) that this sacrament, like chrism,

has the power of perfecting. But it belongs, not to priests, but to bishops, to sign with the chrism. Therefore likewise, to dispense this sacrament belongs to the bishop and not to the priest.

THOMAS RESPONDS:

On the contrary, It is written (De Consecr., dist. 12): “It has come to our knowledge that some priests deliver the Lord’s body to a layman or to a woman to carry it to the sick: The synod therefore forbids such presumption to continue; and let the priest himself communicate the sick.”

I answer that, The dispensing of Christ’s body belongs to the priest for three reasons.” St Thomas

First, because, as was said above (Article 1), he consecrates as in the person of Christ. But as Christ consecrated His body at the supper, so also He gave it to others to be partaken of by them. Accordingly, as the consecration of Christ’s body belongs to the priest, so likewise does the dispensing belong to him.

Secondly, because the priest is the appointed intermediary between God and the people; hence as it belongs to him to offer the people’s gifts to God, so it belongs to him to deliver consecrated gifts to the people.

Thirdly, because out of reverence towards this sacrament, nothing touches it, but what is consecrated; hence the corporal and the chalice are consecrated, and likewise the priest’s hands, for touching this sacrament. Hence it is not lawful for anyone else to touch it except from necessity, for instance, if it were to fall upon the ground, or else in some other case of urgency.

Reply to Objection 1.

The deacon, as being nigh to the priestly order, has a certain share in the latter’s duties, so that he may dispense the blood; but not the body, except in case of necessity, at the bidding of a bishop or of a priest. First of all, because Christ’s blood is contained in a vessel, hence there is no need for it to be touched by the dispenser, as Christ’s body is touched. Secondly, because the blood denotes the redemption derived by the people from Christ; hence it is that water is mixed with the blood, which water denotes the people. And because deacons are between priest and people, the dispensing of the blood is in the competency of deacons, rather than the dispensing of the body.

Reply to Objection 2.

For the reason given above, it belongs to the same person to dispense and to consecrate this sacrament.

Reply to Objection 3.

As the deacon, in a measure, shares in the priest’s “power of enlightening” (Eccl. Hier. v), inasmuch as he dispenses the blood. so the priest shares in the “perfective dispensing” (Eccl. Hier. v) of the bishop, inasmuch as he dispenses this sacrament whereby man is perfected in himself by union with Christ. But other perfections whereby a man is perfected in relation to others, are reserved to the bishop.

City’s Gift of Understanding of Thomas:

Thomas lived (1224-1274AD) and is considered our model Theologian. Look how far we have traveled down this road of desolation since. For what? WHY?

The reading of Thomas reason is quite clear. Priest Hands only!

An exception for the vessel of cup, is a deacon. Even our USACB limits this as the norm. When I was young (pre -Vatican days) all the parish priests made themselves available at every mass to distribute the Body of Christ. If we don’t have the proper consecrated hands then why provide the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity, under both kinds?.. Why create the necessity when it is unnecessary? Why is it more important to have the appearance of two kinds of Eucharist, requiring LEM’s, than proper reverence in handling the Holy Sacrament, and following the guidlines? Why is it more important to have more ministries (LEM’s) involved than to receive “our Divine Savior from Holy hands?” So I can leave Church 2- 5 minutes sooner, because the next Mass is scheduled and the parking lot needs to empty? Is an empty parking lot more important than the Holy Eucharist, in some places?

Since Vatican II opened the Ecumenism doors, Is USACB saying one thing but intending to do another?

Causing many Catholics to suffer and fall into distress as a result of a Priest shortage or something else? “to make protestants feel at home?” What did our USACB say? Is your Church FOLLOWING the Canon and USA CB guidelines or still doing something else still, as those near me?

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion at Mass

http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/order-of-mass/liturgy-of-the-eucharist/extraordinary-ministers

General Principles:

In every celebration of the Eucharist, there should be a sufficient number of ministers of Holy Communion so that it may be distributed in a reverent and orderly manner. Bishops, priests and deacons distribute Holy Communion in virtue of their office as ordinary ministers of the Body and Blood of the Lord. (1) When the size of the congregation or the incapacity of the bishop, priest, or deacon requires it, the celebrant may be assisted by other bishops, priests, or deacons. If such ordinary ministers of Holy Communion are not present, “the priest may call upon extraordinary ministers to assist him, i.e., duly instituted acolytes or even other faithful who have been deputed for this purpose. In case of necessity, the priest may also depute suitable faithful for this single occasion (GIRM 162).”

Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion should receive sufficient spiritual, theological, and practical preparation to fulfill their role with knowledge and reverence. In all matters they should follow the guidance of the diocesan bishop

( Norms for the Distribution and Reception of Holy Communion Under Both Kinds for the Dioceses of the United States of America, NDRHC, no. 28).

When recourse is had to Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion, especially in the distribution of Holy Communion under both kinds, their number should not be increased beyond what is required for the orderly and reverent distribution of the Body and Blood of the Lord. In all matters such Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion should follow the guidance of the diocesan bishop (IBID).

All ministers of Holy Communion should show the greatest reverence for the Most Holy Eucharist by their demeanor, their attire, and the manner in which they handle the consecrated bread or wine. Should there be any mishap–as when, for example, the consecrated wine is spilled from the chalice–then the affected “area . . . should be washed and the water poured into the sacrarium [ GIRM, 280].” (NDRHC, 29).

Liturgy of the Eucharist

  • As the Agnus Dei or Lamb of God is begun, the Bishop or priest alone, or with the assistance of the deacon, and if necessary of concelebrating priests, breaks the eucharistic bread. Other empty ciboria or patens are then brought to the altar is this is necessary. The deacon or priest places the consecrated bread in several ciboria or patens, if necessary, as required for the distribution of Holy Communion. If it is not possible to accomplish this distribution in a reasonable time, the celebrant may call upon the assistance of other deacons or concelebrating priests.
  • If extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion are required by pastoral need, they should not approach the altar before the priest has received Communion. After the priest has concluded his own Communion, he distributes Communion to the extraordinary ministers, assisted by the deacon, and then hands the sacred vessels to them for distribution of Holy Communion to the people.
  • All receive Holy Communion in the manner described by the General Instruction to the Roman Missal, whether priest concelebrants (cf. GIRM, nos. 159, 242, 243, 246), deacons (cf. GIRM, nos. 182, 244, 246), or Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion (cf. GIRM, no. 284). Neither deacons nor lay ministers may ever receive Holy Communion in the manner of a concelebrating priest. The practice of Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion waiting to receive Holy Communion until after the distribution of Holy Communion is not in accord with liturgical law. (NDRHC, 39; GIRM, 160).
  • After all Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion have received the Eucharist, the bishop or priest celebrant reverently hands vessels containing the Body or the Blood of the Lord to the deacons or extraordinary ministers who will assist with the distribution of Holy Communion. The deacon may assist the priest in handing the vessels containing the Body and Blood of the Lord to the Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion. (NDRHC, 40).
  • The proper and only permissible form for distributing Holy Communion is to offer the consecrated bread by saying, “The Body of Christ” and to offer the consecrated wine by saying, “The Blood of Christ.” No other words or names should be added; and the formula should not be edited in any way. (Cf. GIRM, 161; 284-287).
  • If the Eucharistic bread or some particle of it falls, it should be picked up reverently by the minister. The consecrated bread may be consumed or completely dissolved in water before being poured down the sacrarium.
  • Should there be any mishap, for example, if the consecrated wine is spilled from the chalice, the area should be washed and the water poured into the sacrarium.
  • In those instances when there remains more consecrated wine than was necessary, if needs dictate, Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion may consume what remains of the Precious Blood from their cup of distribution with the permission of the diocesan bishop. The sacred vessles are to be purified by the priest, the deacon or an instituted acolyte. The amount of wine to be consecrated should be carefully measured before the celebration so that none remains afterward. It is strictly forbidden to pour the Precious Blood into the ground or into the sacrarium. (NDRHC, 51-55).
  • Similarly, “consecrated hosts are to be reserved in a ciborium or vessel in sufficient quantity for the needs of the faithful; they are to be frequently renewed and the old hosts properly consumed” (Code of Canon Law, no. 939). Burying hosts or consecrated Eucharistic bread is strictly forbidden.

Notes

  1. Norms for the Distribution and Reception of Holy Communion Under Both Kinds for the Dioceses of the United States of America [NDRHC] (August, 2002), no. 26 and cf. GIRM no. 162 and NRHC, no. 28

http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/the-mass/general-instruction-of-the-roman-missal/girm-chapter-4.cfm

GIRM 160-162: Distributing the Eucharist

Virtually all of this content is new to GIRM 2000: 160. The Priest then takes the paten or ciborium and approaches the communicants, who usually come up in procession. It is not permitted for the faithful to take the consecrated Bread or the sacred chalice by themselves and, still less, to hand them on from one to another among themselves. The norm established for the Dioceses of the United States of America is that Holy Communion is to be received standing, unless an individual member of the faithful wishes to receive Communion while kneeling (Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Instruction, Redemptionis Sacramentum 91). When receiving Holy Communion, the communicant bows his or her head before the Sacrament as a gesture of reverence and receives the Body of the Lord from the minister. The consecrated host may be received either on the tongue or in the hand, at the discretion of each communicant. When Holy Communion is received under both kinds, the sign of reverence is also made before receiving the Precious Blood. 161. If Communion is given only under the species of bread, the Priest raises the host slightly and shows it to each, saying, The Body of Christ. The communicant replies, Amen, and receives the Sacrament either on the tongue or, where this is allowed, in the hand, the choice lying with the communicant. As soon as the communicant receives the host, he or she consumes the whole of it. If, however, Communion is given under both kinds, the rite prescribed in nos. 284-287 is to be followed. 162. In the distribution of Communion the Priest may be assisted by other Priests who happen to be present. If such Priests are not present and there is a truly large number of communicants, the Priest may call upon extraordinary ministers to assist him, that is, duly instituted acolytes or even other faithful who have been duly deputed for this purpose.[Cf. Inaestimabile Donum 10; Ecclesiae de Mysterio 8] In case of necessity, the Priest may depute suitable faithful for this single occasion.[Cf. Roman Missal, Appendix III, Rite of Deputing a Minister to Distribute Holy Communion on a Single Occasion] These ministers should not approach the altar before the Priest has received Communion, and they are always to receive from the hands of the Priest Celebrant the vessel containing the species of the Most Holy Eucharist for distribution to the faithful.

FrMichael says: 19 January 2012 at 1:09 pm

Having a debate in the parish about the LEMs “approaching the altar,” based on this new GIRM paragraph. We have a large sanctuary, so the LEMs come up to it and enter it during the Sign of Peace, but stand waiting distinctly at the side about six feet from the altar. They never receive at the altar like the clergy but are brought the Sacred Species. Is this praxis within the purview of this paragraph 162, or should I have them wait outside the sanctuary until the clergy receive Communion?

Is your church following the “norm” established or something else?

GIRM 284-287: How To Provide Communion From The Cup

[source{https://catholicsensibility.wordpress.com/2012/02/13/girm-284-287-how-to-provide-communion-from-the-cup/}]

It’s interesting, don’t you think, that to provide Communion from the Cup, you don’t even need an extraordinary lay minister?

284. When Communion is distributed under both kinds: a) the chalice is usually administered by a Deacon or, in the absence of a Deacon, by a Priest, or even by a duly instituted acolyte or another extraordinary minister of Holy Communion, or by one of the faithful who, in a case of necessity, has been entrusted with this duty for a single occasion; b) whatever may remain of the Blood of Christ is consumed at the altar by the Priest or the Deacon or the duly instituted acolyte who ministered the chalice. The same then purifies, wipes, and arranges the sacred vessels in the usual way.

No surprise that no one is forced to receive Communion: Any of the faithful who wish to receive Holy Communion under the species of bread alone should be given Communion in this form.

Notes for the sacristan: 285. For Communion under both kinds the following should be prepared: a) If Communion from the chalice is done by drinking directly from the chalice, a chalice of a sufficiently large size or several chalices are prepared. However, care should be taken lest beyond what is needed of the Blood of Christ remains to be consumed at the end of the celebration. b) (Eastern rites) If Communion from the chalice is done by intinction, the hosts should be neither too thin nor too small, but rather a little thicker than usual, so that after being intincted partly into the Blood of Christ they can still be easily distributed. 286. If Communion of the Blood of Christ is carried out by communicants’ drinking from the chalice, each communicant, after receiving the Body of Christ, moves to the minister of the chalice and stands facing him. The minister says, The Blood of Christ, the communicant replies, Amen, and the minister hands over the chalice, which the communicant raises to his or her mouth. Each communicant drinks a little from the chalice, hands it back to the minister, and then withdraws; the minister wipes the rim of the chalice with the purificator. 287. If Communion from the chalice is carried out by intinction, each communicant, holding a Communion-plate under the mouth, approaches the Priest who holds a vessel with the sacred particles, with a minister standing at his side and holding the chalice. The Priest takes a host, intincts it partly in the chalice and, showing it, says, The Body and Blood of Christ. The communicant replies, Amen, receives the Sacrament in the mouth from the Priest, and then withdraws.

(NDRHC, 51-55)

In those instances when there remains more consecrated wine than was necessary, if needs dictate, Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion may consume what remains of the Precious Blood from their cup of distribution with the permission of the diocesan bishop. The sacred vessels are to be purified by the priest, the deacon or an instituted acolyte. The amount of wine to be consecrated should be carefully measured before the celebration so that none remains afterward. It is strictly forbidden to pour the Precious Blood into the ground or into the sacrarium. (NDRHC, 51-55).

Have you witnessed this properly being strictly followed many years in the USA. Or do you watch, your LEM’s disappear in a closed room to purify the vessels themselves? PS . An instituted Acolyte is not an LEM and an LEM is not an Acolyte.

Definition of an Acolyte.

An acolyte is a cleric promoted to the fourth and highest minor order in the Latin Church, ranking next to a sub-deacon. The chief offices of an acolyte are to light the candles on the altar, to carry them in procession, and during the solemn singing of the Gospel; to prepare wine and water for the sacrifice of the Mass; and to assist the sacred ministers at the Mass, and other public services of the Church. In the ordination of an acolyte the bishop presents him with a candle, extinguished, and an empty cruet, using appropriate words expressive of these duties . { LEM’s lower than this!}

Prefer Reverent or Profane?

City still is asking,

Why have LEM’s, rules for their use as an “exception”, but then in practice, utilize LEM’s as normal with so called daily exceptions. What is that purpose? Is this creating a custom of intentional, abuses, outrages, or sacrileges only to be used when necessary. Or is this unintentional PRAXIS of the USACB?, while writing clear documents to the contrary?, but permitting the abuse 15 years later?

City asks because many of us that know and once lived, a Holy and Divine Mass, with reverence for our Holy Sacrament was the Norm, not the Exception! When people genuflected before their God, not a head nod or even worse a total lack of acknowledgment of the Lord in the tabernacle, and kept Communication to “only from the Roman Missal”, . Or is it that the tabernacle is now off the altar, hidden to the side or in a separate room, so such reverence needn’t be necessary?

We are still suffering for outrages to our Lord! Thank you Lord for the Fatima Prayer.

THE BEAUTIFUL HANDS OF A PRIEST

We need them in life’s early morning,

We need them again at its close;

We feel their warm clasp of true friendship,

We seek them when tasting life’s woes.

When we come into this world we are sinful,

The greatest as well as the least,

And the hands that make us pure as angels

Are the beautiful hands of a priest.

At the altar each day we behold them,

And the hands of a king on his throne

Are not equal to them in their greatness,

Their dignity stands all alone.

For there in the stillness of morning

Ere the sun has emerged from the East,

There God rests between the pure fingers

Of the beautiful hands of a priest.

When we are tempted and wander

To pathways of shame and of sin.

‘Tis the hand of a priest that absolves us,

Not once, but again and again.

And when we are taking life’s partner,

Other hands may prepare us a feast,

But the hands that will bless and unite us

Are the beautiful hands of a priest.

God bless them and keep them all holy,

For the Host which their fingers caress.

What can a poor sinner do better

Than ask Him, who chose them, to bless?

When death’s dews on our eyelids are falling,

May our courage and strength be increased

By seeing raised o’er us in blessing

The beautiful hands of a priest.

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